Sunday, August 15, 2010

Re-Painting My Cabinets With Milk Paint

I finally got around to painting the old cabinets that were here in the Luck Cabin, although they were not fancy/special I decided they were still functional & good enough to use. I even liked the color variations painted on them, but now that I have discovered the fun, bright and non toxic colors of milk paint I can hardly help myself--- i wanna paint EVerYthinG!
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BEFORE THE MILK PAINT :::::::
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The cabinets were originally all in one weird kitchen set up - which I broke up into two rooms so that the Luck Cabin could have a bathroom. I left the cabinets where they were on the walls and included them in the rooms they ended up in. :)

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PAINTING WITH MILK PAINT::::::

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I took all the cabinet doors off and painted them "salem red" (see top pic)- using the Old Fashioned Milk Paint Co.'s earth pigmented powders meant for covering up prior paint jobs, called Safe Paint. The safe paint is the same formula as the original & ancient milk paint recipe, with variations on the quantities of ingredients - this makes it so it is stronger, richer color, mold resistant, and can be applied over old toxic paints, glass, metal and plastic!

For my cabinets, I wanted a fun nature themed design added- so I decided to add silhouettes in "federal blue" against the brightness of the red. I used a sharp matte knife blade to cut them out of magazines and computer printed pictures.
Once I had them cut out I verrrrry carefully applied the paint through the cut out picture, making sure to hold down tight each little portion while applying the milk paint with a sponge brush. If you use something more stiff to trace and cut out your shapes you don't have to be as rigid, but with paper cut outs, the paper may stick to the paint, so it's important to go slow.
WaY Freakin' COooooL !!!
Each door has a different animal, and one has a tree! My bathroom is native animals and the kitchen is more exotic themed. :)
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AFTER THE MILK PAINT DRIED :::::::::
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LOve it! I can not really recommend this kind of paint enough - I dont know any paint that can do a job this beautiful that also has ZERO environmental effects on water, soil, nature etc... it is made from entirely natural sources, that I believe makes milk paint as clean and eco as it gets.
PS- I know my kitchen is kinda a mess, I swear I cleaned it up after I took this! ;)
Xoxoxoxo

5 comments:

Kittie Howard said...

Leslie, this is fantastic! Never heard of milk paint but am on board (er, in the bucket) now. Love the color choice, the stencils; you do great work, girl. Hub and I are back from holiday; looking forward to more of your projects.

Wild Canary said...

Leslie...I heard from Linda and she is hoping you will send her the box that you have for her...to her father's or Bruce. I am Connie Rae on the Canary Report or Connie Perkins Kille at FB...I tried to message you both places..but I must be duh..tonite...:) take care.

Gratuitous said...

It's interesting that barns were always painted red, because back then what the farmers had to use was paint made from iron oxide (rust), oil, and... milk.

Leslie's Gone Oko said...

Thanks Kittie! Milk paint really is the safest, it also has a neat muted, antique quality to it.
If you want a paint that acts just like modern paint but is no VOC, SAFECOAT is the company to look up. But personally i'd go with milk paint for health & aesthetic reasons.

WIld Canary --- can someone please email me that address! lesrichard AOL dot COM.

Gratu!
That is so true :)))
I have seen black barns in MArshall painted entirely with left over motor oil. Pretty sick but i guess it worked as a good perservative, paint and wasnt dumped directly into the streams. Not sure that would be safe for the animals. My Donkey likes to chew on her barn stall.

Bronwyn Hass said...

Hi there, Leslie! The after shots of your cabinet are great! It became lively and artistic. Plus, the fact that the paint you used is purely natural made it eco-friendly. Anyway, the red color brought coziness to your kitchen. It’s beautiful!

Bronwyn Hass